Health Benefits of Oha soup.

If you are a vegetarian or not, this Igbo soup is absolutely meant for you. It is sweet, nutritious and very easy to make. Oha soup is common in the eastern part of Nigeria and is known for how good it is in enhacing skin radiance and body health.

The ingredients needed in making this soup are the most important components of the soup, they are Oha leaves (as required), Cocao yam (15 to 20 medium sizes) or egusi seed (1 or 2 cups), Chicken, assorted, beef, goat meat, turkey, dry fish or mangala
Maggi (seasoning) 2 to 4 cubes, Crayfish (2 cups), handful of Uziza leaves ( although this is optional), 1 big Stock fish head, Palm oil 15 to 20 centilitres
0.2 cup of ofor or achi as an alternative thickener), Ogiri, salt and pepper to taste.

After getting the ingredients, the next process is to prepare the soup: Wash the cocoyam thoroughly with water to remove dirt and sand, then place in a pot, pour enough water to cover the cocoyam and boil until very tender. Peel off the brown back and pound with mortar and pestle. Blend your fresh pepper with crayfish and keep aside for later use. Pluck off the Uha leaves from the stem, wash it the same way you wash vegetable leaves then use kitchen knife to slice inti the size you want. The next step is to wash your meat clean, steam it with the necessary ingredients for few minutes until it is as soft as the way you desire it to be, while the meat is cooking add hot water into the bowl containing the dry fish and stock fish and allow to boil until tender. Add more (but small quantity of water into the pot of the cooked meat, red oil, blended crayfish and pepper, maggi and salt. Leave to boil; the soup will have taste even though it is watery then add the pounded coco yam or ground egusi (your choice) to serve as thickner. Also, add ogiri at this point. Stir and allow to melt before adding Uziza leaves and Oha leaves. Stir again and leave to boil for another 5 minutes.

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Photo Credit: Ifeyinwa Nzeka/Food musings.

Your Oha soup is ready to be served with any kind of swallow (eba, wheat, semovita or fufu). Do not miss out on this very delicious Igbo soup and considering it is a new month, make it your February healthy African soup. For detailed information, visit http://allnigerianfoods.com/uha-soup or http://www.nigerianfoodtv.com/2013/12/how-to-cook-oha-soup-ora-ofe-oha-ora.html?m=1

Bibiana Ossai © 2016.

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Becoming Somebody I.

Mama, I hear the field is green and the roses are red

The wildflowers are growing in the farmlands and

I just wonder when the girls will be one, Mama

When will the girls be like the boys?

Free like the air with a voice of authority

When will I truly live?

Mama, why cannot the girls be like Papa,

Working day and night to be somebody

Let me run till my feet grow weary

Let me fly till my wings grow faint

There is more to me as there is to life but

Doing nothing and being ill-informed is going to eat me up like a canker worm

Tell me Mama, am I just a sold out slave to nothing and everybody?

A help mate you say I am but how can I help when

I am just a bag of culture, religion, norms and limitations.

You can also read this post Nigerian girl-child the writer is very opinionated and optimistic.

Photo Credit: Diva Diaries.

Bibiana Ossai © 2016.

Being Black Mean.

There’s none better than the other. Black and White are colors made up by men to cause disparity among races that come from the mating of same sperm and egg but due to the ideals the world has built around being white or black, we are often posed with the question ‘what does Being Black Mean?’

Continue reading “Being Black Mean.”

Herbal Drink.

A glowing beautiful melanin or white skin, a healthy human system – danger to sickness and diseases, have you ever wondered just like me how both the poor and rich of the African society are able to stay in good health? I mean, you find both the rich and poor on the same level due to good health. What is the secret you may ask? It is simply leaves, that is, leaves used in making local herbs to be drank, eaten or rubbed by Africans to sustain good health.

Continue reading “Herbal Drink.”

BEBE: IFE MI.

Let me love you with the whole of me

It should not matter whether you would do the same

The thought of loosing you haunts me every night

And I am loosing my mind

Because I cannot bear to live without you.

What have you done to me?

Have you given me fufu to chop like my mama warned me?

If you have charmed me,

then I should thank the gods, should I not?

Everyone speaks about hatred,

My family and friends see only fire in your eyes

Yet all I see is my fate tangled with yours.

Why I love you so much is wetin me no know

But if I talk say I care

It will mean my love for you don die

So make I love you now wey I do

Because it does not matter what anyone says.

Photo Credit: Etsy.

Bibiana Ossai © 2016.

 

 

The Power of the African Culture with Simi.

In an interview held in a two-room, well-conditioned office with Afro-pop and Afro-soul singer, Simisola Ogunleye born in Ondo State, she described herself as simple, honest, creative, happy and a hustler.

When asked about what growing up felt like, she tried to paint a vivid picture of her childhood days by stating that she was a tomboy, spoilt, lived a comfortable life and grew up in a broken marriage. Simisola Ogunleye, famously known as ‘Simi’ made mention of the fact that she has never been to her hometown but the Nigerian culture influences the genre of music that she is into, as most of the lyrics of her songs are in pidgin and the application of certain vocal infection to give her listeners a ‘homely feeling’ when her songs are being played.

Continue reading “The Power of the African Culture with Simi.”

Traditions: Festive Tale.

“Kpa kpa kpa ra kpa”, the sound of knockout could be heard from the verandah of the two storey-building my family and I dwelled in as my sister and I simply enjoyed the breeze and beauty of the night.

Continue reading “Traditions: Festive Tale.”